In the fall of 2006 I went to the John C. Campbell Folk School, located deep in the North Carolina mountains in a small town called Brasstown. The school, positioned
on a 300 acre farm, spurred my dreams. I took an acrylic basic painting class and painted my very first professional painting of my cat Furby. I finally realized the
potential in my skills. Revitalized by the great mountain folks, I came home and began my career in earnest.
I started painting officially on January 1st, 2007.  My goal was to show the beauty of the animals I painted. Whether it was
the writing spider my family watched over for a summer, or a beloved pet we'd had for years, I wanted to share them and story
with others through art.

In February 2008 I registered my business "Art from the Heart" with the state of North Carolina. I've been exploring the world of
animals and nature through my art ever since. When I'm creating art on my own, I express the connection I have to animals and
the fantastical stories they inspire. I've also created for other people, helping share their love for their furry, feathery, and scaly
friends. I've created well over a thousand paintings and sculptures, some of which you can find in my
painting gallery, sculpture
gallery, and illustration gallery.

My first professional painting. "Furby
(original)" 18x24" acrylic on canvas. 2006
Today I live on my parent's 128 acre farm and nature preserve. We still have some of the animals I remember as a child and many new ones. All together we have sixteen cats, two llamas, a pet deer, two emus, a horse, a
yellow-collared macaw and a parrotlet, around thirty barnyard fowl, and numerous wild animals we care for and protect. They are all like family to me! I respect all animals, from cute and cuddly to creepy crawly ~ even spiders
are friends to me. With every walk onto the wild side, I never know what I will see next.

My work can be seen online (obviously), and at various shows and festivals in North and South Carolina. I teach at the Randolph Arts Guild in Asheboro, NC, and I show work at: The Randolph Arts Guild, the Cameron Art
Museum (Wilmington, NC), GreenHill Art Gallery (Greensboro, NC), Theater Arts Gallery (High Point, NC), Mary Martin Gallery (Charleston, SC)

Shows I attend or have attended include: The Roy's Folks Craft Fair, Sanford Arts & Vine, Cedar Mountain Gourd Gathering, Bugfest, Asheboro Fall Festival, Ghost Creek Gourd Gathering, Art in the Park, and more!

Thanks to all my friends and supporters for helping me get this far. This is only the beginning of my life and artistic career and I can't thank you enough!
Original Furby acrylic painting
Born in 1988 and raised on an animal rescue farm, I've always respected nature. Every animal I've ever known has been like family to me. The sprawling landscape
gave me room to explore and enjoy the untouched woodlands.

I was always artsy growing up. No surface went untouched, and taping things together was something I was infamous for. During my high school final project at Trinity
High School in 2006, I researched wildlife art and realized that I could paint. It was then that I knew for sure, as I had dreamt, that I could be a professional artist.
I want my art to come to life and show the true beauty of animals and nature.
You may notice that my work is detailed. I find endless joy in painting and sculpting every fur, feather, scale, hair, and leaf. I often get the comment, "It looks just like a photo!" I want my
art to be real, as if you can touch it, and bring to light what people may not see. Maybe I'm bringing life to a lost friend, or showing the details of an animal that is normally too small to
see. I can credit my OCD to that, but all the tedious details are something I greatly enjoy. When I get to work, time flies so fast.
Family Credits

My mother, Kay Bevan, is a potter working from home. She owns the small business "Four Paw Pottery" and shows her work in her barn shop
and various local shows. She also has a website,

My father, Ricky Bevan, is a general contractor and has owned his business "Ricky L. Bevan Construction" for over 25 years. He's
experienced in his trade and has worked commercially and residentially. He even made our large farm house and restored the antique barn
connected to our farm. You can contact him at Genconrlb@aol.com or 336-362-5019.

My younger sister, Amber Bevan, is an aspiring author. She writes fantasy novels and is in the process of having her first novel published. I'm
her unofficial editor, and I say with truth that her work is amazing and you won't want to miss it!

My grandfather, Dean Spinks, was a renowned local architect and has designed everything from small structures, schools (including the ones I
attended), various commercial buildings, courthouses, and churches. He once aspired to be a cartoonist before he became an architect. It is
his lost dream that has helped me go for my own dreams. He retired in 2012.

My grandmother, Yvonne Spinks, is a multi-talented family artist. She sews, crafts with gourds, cooks, and has the greenest thumb I know. She
has given me some of her crafting skills and green thumb, which helps me appreciate nature so much more. She also grows a majority of the
gourds I use in my sculptures and has helped me tremendously over the years.
All artwork and information (C) to Cara Bevan and Art from the Heart.   
Refer to
contact for questions.
My artistic direction has swayed back and forth over the years, but I am still following my dream - being a professional artist. One year I will sculpt and paint, or not sculpt at all, or hardly paint on canvas and instead focus on
painting my sculptures. I never know from year to year what I will be up to. In 2013, I dedicated most of the year to painting illustrations for my first children's book,
"Improbable...Never Impossible." The involved experience
opened my eyes to something that I have wanted all along...to share stories. Most of my early paintings were inspired by stories, and I wrote them on their pages in my website. Since then I have added "illustrator" to my list of
professions. We will have to wait and see where that goes, now won't we?